Turning segmented objects is similar in many ways to traditional woodturning. But there are subtle differences. Each segmented glue-up can contain dozens or hundreds of precisely made pieces fused into a single rough blank. This construction can sometimes be more fragile than a solid piece of wood, especially during the early roughing out stage of the turn. But there are ways to minimize the risk of “blowing up” the piece. Success starts with proper gouge and hollowing tool selection. WoodTreks guest artisan and Segmented turner, Don Leman shares his thoughts on how he approaches the craft and his special appreciation for the magic that comes from putting a complex segmented stack on the lathe and putting steel to wood. (3.5 Minute Video)

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Comments

Colin

This is such a brilliant website, what more can I say but Thank You.


Clive Brown

Brilliant web site, great commentary and clear videos. I’ve just started open segmented turning and closed segmented rings for the top ring. I’m struggling with the accuracy required for the closed rings having made all sorts of sliding mitre tables for my tablesaw, mitre saw and disc sander. I’m going to try Dons way without sanding the edges of every segment. I’ve bought a new saw blade 2.8 kerf 60t I hope that will be sufficient. This segmented turning is costing me an arm and a leg, not to mention how it’s affecting me mentally! I’ll keep trying and please keep up the web site.


Ryan Brewster

I have been doing some segmented and green wood turning at my school and I have been using mineral oil and bees wax to finish my pieces. I was wondering what you used on your piece, in this video, and where I could get it.

Thanks,
Ryan

Keith’s Note: I’m not sure what Mark used to finish this piece. Sorry.


david silva

JUST BOUGHT A LATH AFTER HAVING ONE 30 YEARS AGO. THING HAVE CHANGED. GREAT STUFF. THANKS


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