In this video we learn how to apply flutes (or reeds) to wood turnings. These decorative flourishes are notable design elements incorporated into many historic furniture styles including the Federal, Hepplewhite, and Sheraton schools. But even contemporary makers employ fluting and reeding within their work. You can too.

If you aren’t already familiar with the terminology, flutes are concave grooves cut along the length of an object. Reeds are cut similarly but their profile is convex. Flat moldings and trim can be reeded or fluted, but, in this video we focus on embellishing “round things” like bedposts and table legs. Johnathan Sanbuichi, turning specialist at Irion Company Furniture Makers, demonstrates how he uses a router mounted in a shop-built jig, a custom made indexing tool, and his massive lathe bed to accurately, quickly and repeatedly produce beautifully flowing carved lines. Learn and enjoy. — Keith (10 Minute Woodworking Video)

Johnathan Sanbuichi is a cabinetmaker and turning expert at the The Irion Company, specialists in the restoration, conservation, and hand-made reproduction of American antique furniture from the 18th and 19th century. Irion is based in Christiana, Pennsylvania.

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There is something intoxicating about the process of turning — part by-the-book technical, part a fluid freestyle dance. For flat-work artisans, those of us who make cases and cabinets, it’s easy to see why so many woodworkers are drawn to this fascinating, and some might say hypnotic specialty of the wood world.

On my recent visit to The Irion Company Furniture Makers, I was delighted to meet and learn from Johnathan Sanbuichi, an accomplished cabinetmaker and turner. In this video, Johnathan demonstrates his approach to the turning of flats, beads and coves, the core design elements found on many styles of beds, chairs, tables, and cabinets —— especially 18th and 19th century furniture styles. In this video, Johnathan explains how to use a “story stick” to lay out and create “elevation” guides that mark key points in these types of designs, how to use calipers and a parting tool to rough-in depth cuts on the lathe, and how to work with a skew or spindle gouge. And along the way, we get a few thoughts on Johnathan’s life in woodworking. Now, how’s that for a deal?

I hope you enjoy this informative and mesmerizing little peak into Johnathan’s world of turning. – Keith (7 Minute Woodworking Video)

Johnathan Sanbuichi is a cabinetmaker and turning expert at the The Irion Company, specialists in the restoration, conservation, and hand-made reproduction of American antique furniture from the 18th and 19th century. Irion is based in Christiana, Pennsylvania.

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Segmented bowls and vessels are made up of dozens or hundreds of small wooden blocks. Segmented woodturners glue these often very tiny pieces into rings which become part of a stack. The process is exacting and critical. But it’s not hard to get good results if you follow the proper steps. In this quick video tutorial, guest artisan, Don Leman will show you first, how to properly prepare and sand the cut segments and then, how to apply the glue for maximum strength in the joints. You’ll also learn how to maintain perfectly flat glue-ups on each ring and on the entire ring stack. Mr. Leman guides you step-by-step through the process. (10.5 Minute Video)

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